Spatial extent mapping methods

Spatial extent mapping methods

Survey the entire site and at the same time draw the location of each plant or each grouping of plants on a topographical map, a detailed reserve map or an aerial photograph, using various permanent landmarks (such as topographical features) for reference. Individual plants or groupings may be marked with numbered posts. Details of the species distribution should be made on the map (or aerial photo) while in the field. Hand drawn maps or even photographs can also be used to supplement this larger map to aid relocation. Spatial mapping can also be done with a hand held GPS unit.

The final maps should include details of the map source, the scale, the direction of north and the name of the species whose distribution is shown. It is also useful to indicate the extent of your survey, time spent searching and when it was conducted. Field forms are not usually required since the information is recorded on site maps or aerial photographs. If field record sheets are used then make note of: name of observer, date, time spent on site, estimate of spatial extent, hand drawn map of site.

This page last updated on 23 Sep 2012